Hannah Sarah McCorriston, 1881-1969

Image © David Blewster Knight. Used with permission.

Image © David Blewster Knight. Used with permission.

Hannah Sarah McCorriston (December 7, 1881-July 26, 1969) was a part-Hawaiian woman born into a prominent family of 19th- and 20th-century Hawaii during the reign of King Kalākaua.

Hannah Sarah McCorriston, known as “Dove,” was born in Kamalō, Molokai, Kingdom of Hawaii, on December 7, 1881, to Hugh McCorriston (1836-1926) and Margaret Louise Gorman (1846-1932). [1] [2] [3]

Throughout her adult life, Dove was a fixture in Honolulu society: she was received by Queen Liliʻuokalani in honor of Her Majesty’s birthday in 1912; celebrated friends with Princess Elizabeth Kalanianaʻole, wife of Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole, and John ʻAimoku Dominis, the hanai son of Queen Liliʻuokalani; and was a frequent guest at many society parties, weddings, teas, and hands of bridge. [4] [5] [6]

Dove was also active in philanthropy and the arts: she volunteered with the Elks’ Club, was a Columbus Welfare worker, and was a senior hostess of the Fort Street USO during World War II, amassing over 500 volunteer hours during the war. [7] [8] [9] [10]

Dove died in Honolulu, County of Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, on July 26, 1969. Her funeral was held at Blessed Sacrament Church in Pauoha, Oʻahu, on July 31, 1969, and she is buried in in Oʻahu Cemetery. [1]

Updated February 2, 2019.


References:

  1. McCorriston, Hannah (Dove) (1969, July 30), The Honolulu Advertiser. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/26754529/hannah_dove_mccorriston_obituary_1969/?xid=637

  2. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 02 February 2019), memorial page for Hannah Sarah McCorriston (7 Dec 1881–26 Jul 1969), Find A Grave Memorial no. 112979693, citing O'ahu Cemetery, Honolulu, Honolulu County, Hawaii, USA; Maintained by David Blewster Knight (contributor 47958606)

  3. H. McCorriston, Kamaaina, dies in 89th year (1926, October 9), The Honolulu Advertiser. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/26367065/hugh_mccorriston_obituary_1926/

  4. Hundreds pay their respects to the Queen (1912, September 3), The Honolulu Advertiser. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27916921/hannah_mccorriston_received_by_queen/

  5. Miss Hazel Maxam honors Miss Booth (1923, October 6), Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27921395/hazel_maxam_gives_tea_1923/

  6. Turn back the clock 25 years (1942, May 16), Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27926772/mrs_carlos_long_hosts_tea_1942/

  7. O! See what’s here! (1911, February 21), Evening Bulletin. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27916684/hannah_mccorriston_candy_booth_at_the/

  8. Columbus Welfare workers in drive for needed money (1922, April 3), Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27921146/columbus_welfare_fundraising_1922/

  9. Women in war work: USO women uphold morale (1943, May 22), Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27927038/hannah_mccorriston_uso_senior_hostess/

  10. Hostesses at USO will receive pins, tonight’s program (1946, February 3), The Honolulu Advertiser. Retrieved from https://www.newspapers.com/clip/27927239/hannah_mccorriston_500_hours_of/


Images: